Dunbar Reads Aloud Launches 1st September

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This session we are going to be asking everyone to get involved again in our reading project Dunbar Reads Aloud. It’s about everyone at Dunbar Primary School and the wider community getting involved in reading again, but this time with an emphasis on reading aloud! The pupils will read aloud to their parents, grandparents, at clubs and during school.

Dunbar Reads Aloud is also about reading lots of different things such as reading the newspaper aloud, reading poetry, reading plays together and reading a recipe to make a cake.

Why are we doing it?

Evidence suggests that children who read for enjoyment every day not only perform better in reading tests than those who don’t, but also develop a broader vocabulary, increased general knowledge and a better understanding of other cultures. Reading any type of material outside of class at least once a week is also associated with greater reading attainment. Those who read the more traditional materials such as fiction, poems and non-fiction, as well as eBooks and comics are more likely to read above the level expected for their age compared with those who read text messages, websites and the like. We want to ensure our pupils, your children, reach their potential and develop the skills of reading.

Practice is the most important part of learning to read and getting better at reading. We need your help and support in our initiative Dunbar Reads Aloud to ensure you hear your child reading, talk to them about reading and, of course, read to them too!

Whilst it may seem strange to ask pupils in P5 upwards to read aloud, it is a skill in being able to read with expression and is a major part of our talking and listening programme – even if they read you a football match report or they read to a younger brother or sister they will be using skills essential for literacy success.

What will the pupils do at school?

The pupils will still be reading lots at school; taking part in Accelerated Reader, working on developing skills such astallying, comprehension and interpretation. We will use individual reading, book detectives and novel studies and do lots of reading aloud.We will also be aiming to read 20,000 books in school by the end ofMay 2015 – yes, that works out at every pupil reading 23 books!

What do pupils have to do?

We will be running our programme throughout the year but there will be 3 blocks when we want you to listen to your child read at least three times a week, for 10-15 minutes and read to them as much as you can.

MEDALS AND PARTY

If they complete the first 10 weeks they will get a Dunbar Reads Aloud bronze medal, the next 10 weeks equals a silver medal and the final 5 weeks means they complete the set with a gold Dunbar Reads Aloud medal. By completing 25 weeks of reading aloud during the year they will be invited to attend our Reading Celebration Party in May!

This year we are going to be very strict about our reading initiative so every pupil must have completed 25 weeks of reading at home and have their record sheet signed by the person they are reading to. This will then guarantee them an invite to the party!

How will the community get involved? Last time, when we ran Dunbar Reads Together, having the wider community involved really helped boost our pupils’ involvement, motivation and engagement. We are planning lots of activities that we hope clubs, shops, businesses, grandparents etc. will join in with to support our children in developing this vital skill.

Dunbar Reads Aloud launches on Monday 1st September. Watch this space and our  Dunbar Reads Aloud website for more details:http://www.edubuzz.org/dunbarreadsaloud/

Practice is the most important part of learning to read and getting better at reading. We need your help and support in our initiative Dunbar Reads Aloud to ensure you hear your child reading, talk to them about reading and, of course, read to them too!

Whilst it may seem strange to ask pupils in P5 upwards to read aloud, it is a skill in being able to read with expression and is a major part of our talking and listening programme – even if they read you a football match report or they read to a younger brother or sister they will be using skills essential for literacy success.

EXTREME READING

Can you take a photograph of yourself reading in an extreme way or place? You could be reading upside down, in a unique setting or even on a rollercoaster!

We will run the competition throughout the year and photos will be added to displays around the school. Look out for more information!

How can you support at home or school?

Please complete the record sheet every time you read together – remember we ask that you do at least three times each week for the three sessions over the year. Try to read a variety of reading material – we will be issuing Dunbar Reads Aloud bingo sheets and hope that every pupil will complete their sheet and bring it back to school for a prize in January 2015!

It’s not just reading aloud for our younger pupils – we need all pupils to read and read aloud. Evidence published recently is proof that reading skills developed whilst sitting next to mum, dad or grandparents on the sofa have a long term effect:

“The IOE study, which is believed to be the first to examine the effect of reading for pleasure on cognitive development over time, found that children who read for pleasure made more progress in maths, vocabulary and spelling between the ages of 10 and 16 than those who rarely read.”

Children who were read to regularly by their parents at age 5 performed better in all three tests at age 16 than those who were not helped in this way.”

If you would like to be a reading volunteer in school please get in touch with Elaine Albano (01368 863773) or (01368 860997) for more information. Even coming in twice a week to hear a pupil read aloud to you will make a massive difference.

Countess Crescent vehicle restictions

On 21st August 2014 the “East Lothian Council (Countess Crescent, Dunbar) (Prohibition of Motor Vehicles) Experimental Order 2014” shall come into effect for a period not exceeding 18 months.

The order places restrictions on Countess Crescent, Dunbar as marked on the map below.

map2

The restrictions are as follows:

Prohibition of Driving between 8.30am-9.30am and 2.45pm-3.45pm Monday to Thursday and 8.30am-9.30am and 11.45am and 12.45pm Friday during School Term Time.

Exemptions are as follows:

  • Any disabled person’s vehicle which (i) displays in the relevant position a disabled person’s badge issued by a local authority
  • Cyclists
  • Vehicles displaying valid residents permit
  • Vehicles used in connection with any building operations or demolition, the removal of any obstruction to traffic, the maintenance or reconstruction of any of the lengths of road
  • Emergency Service vehicles
  • Vehicles used in pursuance of statutory powers and duties
  • Post Office vans used for the purpose of deliveries
  • Vehicles used by a qualified medical practitioner engaged on a house call
  • Vehicles used by registered delivery companies or the discharge of trade or professional services
  • Vehicles used for the purpose of a funeral service
  • Vehicles used in the provision of a social care service

RESIDENTS VEHICLE PERMITS

Residents requiring a permit should apply for the necessary application forms from the Head of Infrastructure, John Muir House, Haddington, East Lothian, EH41 3HA.

‘Residents’ means a person who is solely or mainly resident at premises situated in the lengths of road specified.

The permit should be inserted in the plastic holder supplied by the Council and displayed at the front of the vehicle, preferably above or beside the vehicle excise licence.

ENFORCEMENT

Responsibility for the enforcement of the Order rests with the Police Scotland. If the permit is not displayed during the permitted hours and a vehicle is driven within the restricted streets, an offence will have been committed and a Fixed Penalty Notice may be issued.

OFFENCES

It is an offence to drive or cause to be driven any vehicle within the restricted roads at any time during the controlled hours without displaying a valid permit, even if an application has been posted and / or deposited with the Head of Infrastructure by hand.

The non-endorsable CO can be found on the PDA under “not obeying prohibition” – Section 20 Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 – code 305.029 (£50)

Under Section 115 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984, it is a criminal offence where any person with intent to deceive uses or lends to, or allows to be used by, any other person, any permit, or makes or has in his possession any document so closely resembling any permit as to be calculated to deceive or who forges or alters any permit.

Any applicant who East Lothian council finds have breached the above section will be reported to Police Scotland for the consideration of prosecution.

OFFICER DEPLOYMENT

During the first weeks  officers will patrol the areas at the relevant times.

Tweet Tweet…

WHAT IS TWITTER?

Twitter is an information network made up of 140-character messages called ‘tweets’. It’s an easy way to discover the latest news related to subjects you care about.

HOW IS IT USEFUL?

Twitter contains information you will find valuable. Messages you choose to follow will show up on your home page for you to read on the go using a mobile or tablet.

Dunbar Primary School Twitter
A team of teachers will trial the use of twitter this year. We think it will be a great way for us to instantly share information and our fantastic achievements with parents and the public.

You don’t even need a twitter account, although it will allow you to ‘follow’ us if you do! To view our twitter feed simply click on https://twitter.com/dunbarprimary or search for
@dunbarprimary

Extreme Reading Challenge!

Are you up for the challenge of EXTREME READING THIS YEAR?

Can you take a photograph of yourself reading in an extreme way or place? You could be reading upside down, in a unique setting or even on a rollercoaster!

image

You can e-mail Miss Robertson your photos to: extremeread@gmail.com and they will be displayed around the school.

Mrs Gillanders took some time out from the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow to read over the summer!

Mrs Gillanders - Extreme Reading

 

Results of the 2013-14 Student Evaluation of Experience (SEE) Survey.

1047 P6 pupils took part in the SEE survey with between 1014 and 1035 P6 pupils providing a response to each individual questio

In Dunbar Primary School 117 Children participated. The results from the questions are very positive and will help inform us on what we need to further develop as a school based on the opinions of our P6 pupils.

Summary of Answers from Survey.

Yes/No answers not included

ALL P6 Results
Dunbar Primary School Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Strongly Agree Total Participants Average
Teacher(s) show me how I can improve my learning. 0 3 42 72 117 97.4
My lessons are interesting. 1 3 71 42 117 96.6
I know what I am good at and what I need to work on (develop). 0 0 56 61 117 100.0
I have learned a lot in school. 1 0 22 94 117 99.1
I have learned things about Scotland in school this year. 1 4 63 49 117 95.7
I use my school weblog/website/learning log to help me in my learning. 11 35 55 16 117 60.7
I enjoy being at this school. 3 3 32 79 117 94.9
I have opportunities to contribute to the life of the school. 0 2 57 58 117 98.3
I am able to contribute to decisions made in our school. 0 9 68 40 117 92.3
My school recognises my achievements in school. 0 2 50 65 117 98.3
My school recognises my achievements out of school. 1 8 56 52 117 92.3
I am treated fairly in this school. 1 2 40 74 117 97.4
Most pupils behave well in this school. 0 10 77 30 117 91.5
I feel safe and secure in the school. 0 2 26 89 117 98.3
I know how to keep myself safe when using information technology (e.g. internet and mobile phones). 0 2 20 95 117 98.3
I take account of other people’s feelings and viewpoints. 0 1 51 65 117 99.1
I am encouraged to live a healthy life. 0 1 19 97 117 99.1
I know how to help care for the environment. 0 1 37 79 117 99.1
I have opportunities to get involved with environmental issues in my local neighbourhood. 2 9 62 44 117 90.6
I feel safe to go out in my local neighbourhood during the day. 0 2 27 88 117 98.3
I feel safe to go out in my local neighbourhood during the evening. 2 15 47 53 117 85.5
Young people are treated with respect in my local neighbourhood. 0 3 46 68 117 97.4
I feel young people’s views are listended to. 0 4 57 56 117 96.6
I know what to do if I am not happy about how someone is treating me. 0 3 33 81 117 97.4