Health and Wellbeing

Introduction

This page will provide you with an overview of approaches we use when teaching Health and Wellbeing.  If you scroll down the page you will also find a copy of the following policies – health, anti-bullying and equal opportunities.

All children in the school undertake core activities in health and wellbeing, including – circle time, golden rules, assemblies, anti-bullying week, health and eco week.  Programmes of work include these topics –

Nursery– People Who Help Us, Toothbrushing, Early Moves, Healthy Eating, Myself, Golden Rules

Primary 1 – Who I Am and Keeping Safe including road safety, Basic Moves

Primary 2 – Keeping Healthy, Looking after our Environment, Road Safety, Cool in School, Basic Moves, Pupil Council, ECO Group

Primary 3 – Feelings, Good Relationships, Road Safety, Rights Respecting School, Basic Moves, Playground Buddies, Pupil Council, ECO Group

If you would like any further information regarding these programmes, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us.

Policies

Health Promoting School Policy

Introduction

Schools can make a significant contribution to increasing the quality of life for their pupils, staff and wider community by becoming a health promoting school (HPS).

“A health promoting school is one in which all members of the school community work together to provide pupils with integrated and positive experiences and structures which promote and protect their health. This includes both the formal and the informal curriculum in health, the creation of a safe and healthy school environment, the provision of appropriate health services and the involvement of the family and wider community in efforts to promote health.”

World Health Organisation (WHO), 1995

In collaboration with local authorities, NHS boards and the wider community, all schools were given the target of becoming a HPS by 2007 by the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED). Haddington Infant School attained level 1 Health promoting School status in December 2007.

Rationale

“To achieve their potential, school children must participate fully in educational activities. To do this they must be healthy, attentive and emotionally secure”              

World Health Organisation (WHO), 2000 

All schools are required to provide health education, which ideally takes place within a stimulating yet safe and supportive environment that both promotes and protects the health and wellbeing of all members of the school community.

Within health promoting schools, not only is health education integral to the curriculum but the

school ethos, policies, services, extra-curricular activities and partnerships foster emotional, mental, physical, social wellbeing and healthy development.”

Towards a Healthier Scotland – A White Paper on Health,

The Scottish Office, 1999

Health is taken to mean physical, social, spiritual, mental and emotional well-being in relation to

oneself, society and the environment. Becoming a HPS provides a way for each school to listen to, and take account of, the views of pupils, parents and staff.  A positive, HPS ethos can influence health, attainment, achievements and expectations. Health promoting actions can change the attitudes and behaviour of pupils towards a positive lifestyle, encouraging pupils to make informed choices about their health and life style.

 

Aims

Within Haddinton Infant School, our HPS policy aims to:

· Promote the physical, social, mental and emotional health and well-being of all children, young people and staff;

· To work with others to identify and respond to the health needs of the whole school community and contribute to meeting these needs

How are we going to do it?

 

Learning and Teaching

Within Haddington Infant School, we employ a range of learning and teaching approaches that are well suited to different needs, aptitudes and learning styles of pupils. Providing opportunities for children to learn individually and in groups. A supportive range of opportunities are offered within and beyond school. We use formative assessment strategies to involve the children in their learning, teaching our pupils learning skills for life. Particular attention is given to helping pupils establish values, attitudes, knowledge and skills that will enable them to make well-informed decisions about a healthy lifestyle. We have adopted the East Lothian Learning and Teaching Policy, please refer to this for learners’ entitlements.  We have a health programme which addresses the requirements of CfE, ensuring pace, progression and breadth.

Nursery

All the nursery staff are aware of and use the National Guidance for Early Y, food choices for children aged 1-5 years in early education and childcare settings, for the buying and preparation of food in the nursery.

Leadership Team

The leadership team manage the implementation of the HPS policy, ensuring that

the pupils, staff and parents are aware of, and promote the values and aims of a HPS. The DHT is the health promoting school co-ordinator.

Staff

All members of the school community have a responsibility to

· Ensure a safe, supportive and challenging atmosphere

· Value and care for each other

· Encourage a sense of belonging

· Promote self-esteem and respect

· Provide good opportunities for partnership working

· Use every opportunity to improve the environment, resources and facilities of the school

· Use the curriculum effectively to:

_ experience a range of educational, social and cultural opportunities

_ make informed choices and decisions that help to ensure a healthy lifestyle

_ make positive contributions to the well-being of the school and the wider community

Parents/Carers

Parents/careers will be encouraged to take an active part in seeking to improve the health of their children. Parents/careers will be encouraged to play an active role in supporting their children’s learning at home and to learning situations in the school with particular regard to health-related issues and events.

                                                                                                            Reviewed February 2010

Anti-Bullying Policy

Rationale

We believe that our pupils have the right to learn in a supportive, caring and safe environment.  We encourage responsible citizenship.  We make it clear that anti-social behaviour is unacceptable and will not be tolerated.

Definition

We, at Haddington Infant School, agree with the Government’s definition of bullying as,

behaviour by an individual or group, usually repeated over time, that intentionally hurts another individual or group, either physically or emotionally.

Behaviour is bullying behaviour if

  • It is repetitive, wilful or persistent
  • It is intentionally harmful, carried out by an individual or group, and,
  • There is an imbalance of power leaving the person who is bullied feeling defenceless.

 

Guiding principles for Haddington Infant School are enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1991):

            “Education should develop each child’s personality and talents to the full.  It should encourage children to respect their parents, and their own and other cultures.”                                                                                 (Article 29)

            “Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for, and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else looking after them.”                                                                 (Article 19)

Our school aims are

  • We aim to create a happy environment by promoting positive values.
  • We aim to support pupils, parents and teachers in creating an exciting and effective, learning and teaching environment.
  • We aim to create a caring ethos where everyone takes responsibility for themselves and values each other.
  • We aim to foster creativity, confidence, a healthy attitude and responsibility in developing skills for life.
  • We aim to include everybody fairly and as fully as possible.
  • We aim to ensure all pupils achieve their full potential and do their best

 

The Pupils

Must behave acceptably and must recognise bullying as,

  • Physical  =  punching, kicking, hitting, etc
  • Verbal  =  name calling, teasing, etc
  • Exclusion  =  ignoring, omitting
  • Damage/Taking  =  breaking or taking others belongings or things

 

Pupils must know what to do if they are being bullied

  • Do not be silent. 
  • Shout No!  Walk away – Go to an adult or friend immediately
  • Tell an adult you trust.  You will get support.

 

Teachers and Playground Supervisors must

  • Listen
  • Discuss
  • Deal quickly, firmly and fairly with complaints
  • Use a positive approach 
  • In the playground, recognise that a child may need time out, note any bullying in behaviour book which is regularly reviewed by the leadership team
  • Teachers, when necessary should involve the leadership team and/or involve parents
  • In class, use circle time, appropriate story books, religious and moral education and social and personal development times to raise and discuss issues
  • Offer support
  • Encourage the pupils to sign the anti-bullying contract (kept in PT’s office)

 

Support for the child displaying anti-social behaviour

  • Talk and listen to discover reasons
  • Re-iterate the policy that bullying behaviour is not acceptable
  • Review the child’s entitlement to Golden Time (see behaviour policy)
  • Report bullying incidents to the head teacher
  • The head teacher will make a note of incident in behaviour tracking folder
  • A warning may be given, a slip home or contact made with the parents

 

November 2008

EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES

The Equal Opportunities Policy is contained in the school policy file and applies to the nursery.  We are a UNICEF Rights respecting School.

 

Nursery staff should consider the following when communicating with parents, planning for learning, supporting children and using resources in the nursery.

  • Ensure the environment is free from discrimination or prejudice.
  • Provide clear, unambiguous written communication.
  • Wherever possible provide information in the languages of the parents and carers using the nursery.
  • Promote non-verbal and verbal communication.
  • Value the child’s home language and encourage its use so that the child can respond confidently and express their own needs, thoughts and feeling.
  • Provide support and work in partnership with all parents and carers and be aware of the diversity or dynamics of a family unit regardless of gender, race, religion and culture.
  • Provide equal opportunities for boys and girls to participate in the full range of learning experiences.
  • Encourage positive attitudes towards others whose gender, language, religion and culture is different from their own.
  • Provide non-stereotypical books, jigsaws, pictures, stories and rhymes in showing positive images of different people of different races and cultures and showing boys and girls, men and women in a range of non-stereotypical roles.
  • Support children in becoming aware of and learning about cultural and religious festivals and events and become aware of the beliefs and traditions of their own family and the way of life of others in their community and the wider community.
  • Be sensitive to the needs of the individual child whether they are gender, religion, cultural, language or additional support needs.
  • Ensure suitable access to the building, resources and equipment for children with additional support needs.
  • Ensure the needs of children with additional support needs are met through planning.

 

The following will guide us

The Equal Opportunities Act 1996

The Children (Scotland) Act 1995

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995

The race Relations Act 1995

The Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000

The Sex Discrimination Act 1975

The National care Standards (Care Commission)

Standards in Scotland’s School Act 2000

A Curriculum for Excellence

The Child at the Centre

How Good is Our School?

National care Standards – early Education and Childcare up to the age of 16          Nov 2008 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES

The Equal Opportunities Policy is contained in the school policy file and applies to the nursery.  We are a UNICEF Rights respecting School.

 

Nursery staff should consider the following when communicating with parents, planning for learning, supporting children and using resources in the nursery.

 

·        Ensure the environment is free from discrimination or prejudice.

·        Provide clear, unambiguous written communication.

·        Wherever possible provide information in the languages of the parents and carers using the nursery.

·        Promote non-verbal and verbal communication.

·        Value the child’s home language and encourage its use so that the child can respond confidently and express their own needs, thoughts and feeling.

·        Provide support and work in partnership with all parents and carers and be aware of the diversity or dynamics of a family unit regardless of gender, race, religion and culture.

·        Provide equal opportunities for boys and girls to participate in the full range of learning experiences.

·        Encourage positive attitudes towards others whose gender, language, religion and culture is different from their own.

·        Provide non-stereotypical books, jigsaws, pictures, stories and rhymes in showing positive images of different people of different races and cultures and showing boys and girls, men and women in a range of non-stereotypical roles.

·        Support children in becoming aware of and learning about cultural and religious festivals and events and become aware of the beliefs and traditions of their own family and the way of life of others in their community and the wider community.

·        Be sensitive to the needs of the individual child whether they are gender, religion, cultural, language or additional support needs.

·        Ensure suitable access to the building, resources and equipment for children with additional support needs.

·        Ensure the needs of children with additional support needs are met through planning.

 

The following will guide us

The Equal Opportunities Act 1996

The Children (Scotland) Act 1995

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995

The race Relations Act 1995

The Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000

The Sex Discrimination Act 1975

The National care Standards (Care Commission)

Standards in Scotland’s School Act 2000

A Curriculum for Excellence

The Child at the Centre

How Good is Our School?

National care Standards – early Education and Childcare up to the age of 16          Nov 2008

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