Wellington Square reading activities online

The Wellington Square website is designed for use alongside the book components of the Wellington Square Reading Scheme. This scheme provides interesting and lively stories for lower ability readers.

The website is easy to navigate and contains a range of activities to support the teaching of reading skills to pupils with Additional Support Needs.

After logging onto the website, pupils are able to enter the Character pages. The character pages follow the same format and are all updated over the course of a term. Each character area contains an introduction, game, quiz, character information, character facts and character questions.  A coloured logo on each web page specifies the reading level for that page. Vocabulary from that level’s word wall is included in the text and there are links to some of the books the pupils may have read.

Pupils must read each character’s area before attempting the quiz section, as all questions are related to the character information and character facts. The website also has ‘Ask a Question’ which pupils can address to a character and receive a reply on the website the following day.

These resources could be used in a variety of settings – whole class teaching, group work or independently.  Worth a look!

Dyslexia Awareness Week: Dispelling Myths 1 + 2

Myth: Dyslexia does not exist.

Fact: Dyslexia is one of the most researched and documented conditions that affect children. Over 30 years of independent, scientific, replicated, published research exists on dyslexia.

Myth: Dyslexia is a “catch all” term.

Fact: That was true back in the 1960’s and 1970’s before the research existed. Here is Scotland we have a research-based definition of dyslexia, as follows:

Dyslexia can be described as a continuum of difficulties in learning to read, write and/or spell, which does not respond well to conventional teaching techniques. These difficulties often do not reflect an individual’s cognitive ability and are often not typical of performance in other areas.

The affect of dyslexia as a barrier to learning varies in degree according to the learning environment and the demands of the curriculum as there are associated difficulties such as:

  • auditory and /or visual processing of language-based information
  • phonological awareness
  • oral language skills and reading fluency
  • short-term and working memory
  • sequencing and directionality
  • number skills
  • organisational ability

Motor skills and co-ordination are often affected.

Dyslexia exists in all cultures and across the range of abilities and socio-economic backgrounds.  It is neurological in origin; a hereditary, life-long condition.  Unidentified, dyslexia is likely to result in low self esteem, high stress, atypical behaviour, and low achievement. 

Dyslexia Awareness Week: Myths about Dyslexia

See you on the other side by Annalisa Shepherd

Next week is Dyslexia Awareness Week and I shall be posting something here every day.

First, here is a list of myths about dyslexia. I’ll make sure each one is debunked before the end of the week!

Myth 1: Dyslexia does not exist.

Myth 2: Dyslexia is a “catch all” term.

Myth 3: Intelligence and ability to read are related. So if someone doesn’t read well, they can’t be very bright. Equally, very able children cannot be dyslexic.

Myth 4: People with dyslexia cannot read.

Myth 5: People with dyslexia see things backwards.

Myth 6: Dyslexia is rare.

Myth 7: Dyslexia is a medical diagnosis.

Myth 8: Children outgrow dyslexia.

Myth 9: Dyslexia affects four times more boys than girls.

Myth 10: Any child who reverses letters or numbers has dyslexia.

Myth 11: Every child who struggles with reading is a learner with dyslexia.

Myth 12: Children with dyslexia are just lazy. If only they tried harder…

 

Thanks to Annalisa Shepherd for the picture.

New era for Scottish literacy

 The Scottish Government announces that breaking the long standing link between poverty and poor literacy will be the focus of action to improve literacy in Scotland.

Published on Wednesday 27 October, the Literacy Action Plan – the first of its kind since devolution – includes a range of actions from early years through to employment, aimed at eradicating poor literacy across the country.

Key actions include:

  • Vulnerable families to be targeted as part of the Play Talk Read campaign
  • Curriculum for Excellence supporting literacy from a child’s early years
  • New National Qualifications to support the development of literacy skills
  • More support for workplace learning.

National Advocacy Service launched

Support for young people

The creation of a new additional support needs national advocacy service was announced today.

Barnardo’s Scotland in partnership with the Scottish Child Law Centre have been awarded the contract to provide free lay and legal advice to families and young people who appeal to the Additional Support Needs Tribunals for Scotland (ASNTS) against education authorities’ decisions regarding the provision of educational support, such as out of area placing requests.

Dyslexia Awareness Week

1-7 November is Dyslexia Awareness Week

This year the Dyslexia Awareness Week theme is Hidden Dyslexia.

CPD Bytes is offering 10 complimentary online ‘Hidden Dyslexia‘ courses each worth £100 to raise teachers’ awareness of the impact of unidentified dyslexia on learners,

For a your free entry please Click Here and fill in the simple form. or copy and paste this link into your browser window http://cpdbytes.us2.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=79b9667153aaee41587daf08f&id=e262cf8aeb

The prizes will be drawn on the 7th November at 12 noon. All the winners will be notified by e-mail and a list of all the prize winners will be displayed on the website www.cpdbytes.com.
Every entrant will be eligible for a 50% discount on our popular Hidden Dyslexia Course if ordered before the end of November.

Good luck in the draw.

Several support for learning teachers in East Lothian have taken this course and have found it useful. Contact Hilery Williams for more information.

Switch accessible activities FREE online

Inclusive Technology have a section on their website called HelpKidzLearn with free games and activities.  These are high quality resources giving you a taster of some of Inclusive’s bespoke software.  From simple Cause and effect switching activities  you can progress onto ‘Wait then Press’ activities (eg.  Mystery Egg in the Early Years section).  Increase a pupil’s concentration and co-ordination skills with Catch the Crocs  (games section) or improve letter recognition on the keyboard by playing Letter Pop! (Find out section).  Have fun!

A new suite of tests for assessing reading comprehension

At the Scottish Learning Festival last week I attended an interesting seminar on a new (to me) assessment of reading with which I was very impressed. It replaces the Neale Anaylis to some extent.

Maggie Snowling  heads the team which developed this assessment. She is a well known proponent of the links between phonological processing ability and literacy acquisition and highly regarded.

The York Assessment of Reading for Comprehension (YARC) enables teachers to assess their pupils’ reading skills from an early age through to secondary school. It focuses not just on decoding and sight reading, but crucially on reading comprehension.

The assessments at passage level concentrate on reading for meaning, enabling pupils’ reading and reading comprehension to be regularly assessed and progress easily monitored. Questions linked to each passage demand the use of deduction and inference to arrive at the answers, giving teachers vital information about their pupils’ skills far beyond decoding and retrieval of information.

In addition to the passages for pupils, YARC also includes four short tests:

• letter-sound knowledge,

• sound deletion (supported by pictures)

• sound isolation

• early word recognition.

These are specifically designed for five and six year olds, although data will be available for the age range four to seven years. Assessing alphabetic knowledge, phonological skills and word reading, these tests are especially useful at identifying any underlying difficulties in phonological awareness and the acquisition of letter-sounds that could hamper progress in pupils’ reading.

The Passage Reading set comprises two equivalent passages for each year from Reception (P1) to Y6 (P7), each with eight comprehension questions of increasing complexity. A version of GL Assessment’s Single Word Reading Test is also included as a benchmark test.

The secondary reading tests include Passage Reading to assess reading comprehension skills, Reading Fluency and Single Word Reading.

Well worth checking out in my opinion.