Parent/Guardian Letter from Police Scotland

OFFICIAL: NONE

Dear Parent or Guardian,

Across the country, young people are increasingly being asked by fraudsters to receive and send money through their own bank accounts, sometimes keeping some of the cash for themselves. This is commonly known as being a money mule.

Criminals need money mules to launder the profits of their crimes. Mules will usually be unaware of where the money comes from – often fraud and scams – and that it can go on to fund crimes such as drug dealing and people trafficking.

Fraudsters will approach young people online or in person, including through social media, and at school, college or sports clubs. Sometimes it’s people they know who persuade them to become a money mule, often because they are also doing it.

Being a money mule is illegal.

When someone is caught, their bank account will be closed, and they will have problems getting student loans, mobile phone contracts and credit in the future. They could even face arrest for money laundering which carries a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison.

We need your help to warn young people about the dangers and consequences of becoming a money mule.

Tell-tale signs that someone might be involved include them suddenly having extra cash, buying expensive new clothes or top-of-the-range mobile phones and gadgets with very little explanation as to how they got the money. They may also become secretive, withdrawn or appear stressed.

You can find out more information and advice by visiting www.moneymules.co.uk.

If you are worried that someone close to you might be caught up in money muling, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or Victim Support on 08 08 16 89 111.

You can also report a fraud in Scotland to Police Scotland by calling 101.

Please do not attempt to contact any individual you suspect of being involved in money muling.

OFFICIAL: NONE

Jessie & Friends: online safety education for 4-7s


CEOP Education Team announce the launch of Jessie and Friends, a new online safety education resource for 4-7 year olds.

Jessie & Friends is a three-episode animated series from ThinkUKnow which aims to equip 4-7 year olds with the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to help them stay safe from sexual abuse and other risks they may encounter online.

“We are delighted to announce the launch of Jessie & Friends, our new online safety education resource for 4-7 year olds.
Based on a series of three fun, age-appropriate animations, Jessie & Friends follows Jessie, Mo and Tia as they view, share and game their way towards a safer future online.”

CEOP Education Team

NSPCC Sexting Guidance

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James White at Ineqe Group (www.ineqe.com) has drawn our attention to this NSPCC guidance on sexting.

NSPCC Research – 15% increase in counselling related to sexting.

NSPCC has produced a guide to assist parents talk with children about the dangers and legalities surrounding sexting, empowering them to say no to requests. Access to the guide can be found here http://buff.ly/2aXXSFJ

 

Safer Internet Day 2015: 10th February

Safer Internet Day

The theme this year for Safer Internet Day is about keeping the channels of communication open between parents/carers and young people about their online activities.

Parents and carers play a crucial role in supporting children to navigate the risks and make the most of the opportunities offered by technology. The most important thing you can do is to  stay engaged with your children’s digital lives.

Often we hear about the negative impact that the internet and new technology has on young people, but on Safer Internet Day we want to celebrate the positives and to explore what we can all do to make sure that all young people have a positive time online.

Teachers can find related resources and lesson activity plans here

Is it okay to copy an Edubuzz photo and put it on Facebook?

Question:  Is it okay for a parent /carer to copy a photo from Edubuzz and put it on Facebook?

Answer:     It is clearly okay for a parent to do what he or she wants with his/her own child’s photograph.  If other children are included in this photo the parent/carer should check with the children involved, or their parents/carers, that they don’t mind their photos being put on Facebook.

 This is exactly the same rule as we teach the children: you shouldn’t share photos or video recordings of people without asking their permission. Parents /carers can help support that teaching by setting an example themselves. 

If  any parents/carers  particularly object to their child’s photos being posted on Facebook, you can remind them that you can tell Facebbok to ask your permission before allowing anyone to tag you in any photos. This won’t stop them being uploaded, of course, but it makes them much less easy to find.

 We do not usually assert copyright of the contents of our web sites, so there is no legal, intellectual property, issue at stake.

For more information, go to this website  https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/Primary/