Listen, Think, Draw

It was lovely to have Clare Mills of Listen, Think, Draw in school,

to work with so many of the pupils, some of the parents and the staff to create a visual storyboard of the vision and values / ethos of the school on Tuesday.

Lots shared, particularly by the pupils involved, to further expand on the ideas already collated – and this should make a lovely representative display for the foyer, which may be added to in time.

Thanks Clare!

Friends of Pencaitland Parks

Interested in improvements to the local park(s)? With Woodhall Park just finished – and inspiration from Ormiston Park (work in progress) and others like Cuthill Park…can Pencaitland rise to the challenge?

All our children need to play…and so you are invited to get together to help develop options.

Friday 9th March, Winton Arms, just before pick up (11-12am) is when it all starts, with a chat.

Fostering in East Lothian

Could you foster?

Spare Room – Sophie’s Room?

Do you have room in your home and your heart?We used virtual reality to show people how their spare room could change a child's life. Most hadn't considered fostering before. Watch them change their minds.

Posted by Action for Children on Saturday, January 27, 2018

If you are interested and would like to find out more…..please get in touch with fostering@eastlothian.gov.uk.

East Lothian has a significant shortfall in foster homes – someone with a spare room and caring heart could be all it takes to start the process. Applicants are supported throughout by an ELC dedicated team, to determine if this is a good opportunity and you could make a significant difference to young children in your care, so there’s no need to worry about jumping right in to delivering the care – vetting and training are part of the process.

More info can be found here.

Why do foster carers decide to foster?

Why do foster carers decide to foster? We wanted to know more. We invited them in for a chat, but there was one small catch… we didn't tell them that it wouldn't be us asking the questions.

Posted by Action for Children on Monday, January 15, 2018

 

 

SPTC has a new name.

Connect. 

The Scottish Parent Teaching Council – which Pencaitland PS is a member of – has re-branded.

The new name reflects the growth and the direction of partnerships between parents and carers, pupils, school staff and local authorities / education in Scottish Government.

At Connect we strive to make parental involvement in Scottish education as good as it can be. We do this by working with parents and educators. We provide information, advice and training, all focussed on parental engagement in children’s learning. Sign up for our eNewsletters here and Parents’ Voice survey group here. Connect is a trading name of Scottish Parent Teacher Council, a Scottish charity funded mostly by membership.

 

Parent Council invitation…for you.

Especially for you – and you, and you.

Parent Council video…takes less than 2 mins to watch. 

“Every parent and carer involved with the school and their child’s education is making a difference.”

PPS Parent Council

Parent Council invites you…. Animated Video created using Animaker – https://www.animaker.com

Posted by Loreen Pardoe on Friday, February 2, 2018

School Should Be A Joyful Place – Children’s Parliament.

School should be a Joyful Place

– Report by the Children’s Parliament. Find the full document here.

School should be a joyful place.

Children’s Parliament is Scotland’s Centre for Excellence for Children’s Participation and Engagement. Our work draws on children’s participation in Children’s Parliament programmes, projects and consultations from 2008 to 2016. Some work is named in the body of the report, all of the referenced work is identified in the appendix. The illustrations come from several Children’s Parliament programmes and consultations and from a workshop with children in December 2016 where they reviewed our findings and authenticated the key messages presented here. The views and experiences shared in this report give us much food for thought, especially in the context of Scotland’s aspiration of becoming the best place to go to school. What children have said has also been the basis of a formal submission to the Scottish Government’s Education Governance Review (2016).

Six Themes were identified by the children and projects used.

Part 1: A school that is excellent and equal

Part 2: Having a say about learning and life at school

Part 3: Support at school

Part 4: Getting parents and carers involved with school

Part 5: Teachers

Part 6: Other topics • Play, sport and physical activity • Poverty • Technology • Homework • Wellbeing

 

SAMH – for Scotland’s Mental Health

SAMH is working hard to support provision of mental health services in Scotland and to improve attitudes and policies surrounding mental health.
They are looking into situations where young people have been referred to a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) for support, but then haven’t been accepted by that service for various reasons. They want to hear from any young person who has experienced this scenario and may ask to include you/ your experiences in some research.

To contribute, fill out this survey and feel free to share with any friends, classmates, family members or other young people you know who may have experienced this sort of situation. (Perhaps they were never even referred despite needing help and support?). The survey is targeted towards the past 2 years, from January 2016.

“SAMH are committed to finding out more about why this happens and what happens to the children and young people who are not accepted on to the service”. (This may also interest those if ‘very quickly discharged’).

Have your say – on ELC budget.

How to do more with less. 

It’s not good news. ELC, like other local authorities, are having to work out “How to do more, with less.” In reality, hefty cuts in non-statutory provision are expected.

As the residents of East Lothian, your views are requested. Find the Budget consultation here. Find Shaping our Services here as ELC look ahead to the need to ‘do more with less’.