All posts by nedwards

Life Cycles

We have been learning about life cycles at nursery.The life cycle process fascinated the children and they watched daily to record the changes. They learned how the butterfly uses it’s long tongue (proboscis) to drink the sweet juice from the flowers (nectar).

The butterflies were released into the garden but we were lucky enough to see them up close.
The butterflies were released into the garden but we were lucky enough to see them up close.

(Tia, age 4) ‘When our caterpillars arrived they were little. Then they got even bigger because they had special food to eat. Soon they were sleeping in their chrysalis, sometimes it’s called a cocoon. They were in there for a long time. They turned into a lovely brown and orange butterfly.’
(Painted Lady Butterfly)
We experimented with the paint to learn more about symmetry.
We experimented with the paint to learn more about symmetry.

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We were also very luck to obtain some frogspawn. Again the children were fascinated. They helped to look after the tadpoles by cleaning out the tank and feeding them with special food developing their awareness of what is required to help them grow and how they change over time.
Helping to look after our tadpoles.
Helping to look after our tadpoles.

(Nathan, age 5) ‘The frogspawn changed and the tadpoles grew the back legs. Then the front legs came and it’s tail disappeared. They had turned into frogs.’
(Dylan, age 4) ‘The frogs jump and ‘ribbet’.
The tiny frogs were returned to the pond.frog

Riding of the Marches 2016

The 'Turf Cutter'.
The ‘Turf Cutter’.
A visit to the local 'yarn bomb' display.
A visit to the local ‘yarn bomb’ display.
Some of the children enjoying our 'Riding of the Marches' board game.
Some of the children enjoying our ‘Riding of the Marches’ board game.
We have been learning about this very special custom, which occurs every 21 years. The project began with an interest in horses and how they were used in the past and now in the present. When the children heard that a special celebration will take place in July, called the Riding of the Marches, their interest grew. They have thoroughly enjoyed learning about the principles and the turf cutting stations and are able to discuss this with enthusiasm. On a daily basis, we hear them cry, “It’s a oor ain.” We would like to thank Mr Alan Williams, Halberdier in the ROTM 2016, and Grandad to two of our nursery children. He visited this week and (in Charlotte’s own words) told a great story about Musselburgh, explaining this very old custom and the reasons for protecting the boundaries of Musselburgh. The children were very excited to see the ‘Halberd’.
Mr Williams shows the 'Halberd', used to protect the Provost.
Mr Williams shows the ‘Halberd’, used to protect the Provost.

The Riding of the Marches Rosette.
The Riding of the Marches Rosette.

We have decorated our garden with ‘yarn bomb’ decorations of our own as part of our preparations for the upcoming event and are looking after the flowers we have planted to ensure our garden is beautiful for the celebration.
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The Halberdier is getting ready to guard the Provost.
The Halberdier is getting ready to guard the Provost.
The Turf Cutters Assistant
The Turf Cutters Assistant

Shiny, Slimey, Snails

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The children have been learning all about snails, after finding one in the nursery garden. They have watched them in the tank and as they move across the paper, leaving their slimy snail trail behind. They have talked about how to care for the snails, what they like to eat and how to handle them carefully. They have also learned interesting things, using our ‘facts book’, such as how the snail slime helps them to glide along and protects the ‘foot’ from being scratched when they crawl over stones and walls.

Busy Builders

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The children have enjoyed the view of the building site from the nursery window. They have watched the forklift truck lifting heavy items up to a great height. Some of the children decided to make a second ‘building site’ in our own garden, creating shops, schools and houses. They have used the vehicles to transport a variety of resources to and from the ‘site’ and had a great time being ‘the builders’.

The last of our daffodil bulbs have now been planted. We have put the potted bulbs into a dark place for the winter but the children will help to keep the compost moist so they grow strong. In the spring we will see the changes that have occurred. The daffodils will be sold to help raise money for Marie Curie Cancer Care.DSCF1143