Race Equality resource

 http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/raceequality/index.asp
How do you recognise a racist incident? What should you do if one of your pupils uses a racist term? How can you promote better race relations in your school?

The new Race Equality resource helps teachers answer these questions and tackle the problem of racism in schools. The website clarifies what racism means in Scottish society today and identifies a wide range of racist behaviour. By looking at the effect racism has on victims and the broader community, it explores the role that schools can play in discouraging racist behaviour and dealing with it appropriately when it happens.

A selection of anti-racist teaching materials have been developed to encourage children to understand the history of Scotland’s diverse society, the difficulties faced by immigrants today, the causes and devastating effects of racism, and the importance of racial tolerance.

The new site supports the Scottish Government’s One Scotland campaign to tackle racist attitudes in Scotland.

Boys beat girls for reading support

http://education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,,2273898,00.html
The Guardian reports that girls are in danger of being overlooked by current education policy drives that focus on boys, the National Literacy Trust charity warned today.

Out of around 1,600 male and female pupils from primary and secondary schools in the UK surveyed by the trust, a “significant proportion” of girls (201) defined themselves as non-readers, compared to 626 girls who considered themselves as readers. While the non-readers can and do read, 60% said they find reading boring and fear being labelled “geeky”.

Bilingual staff ‘can halt Polish exodus’

http://news.scotsman.com/education/Bilingual-staff-39can-halt-Polish.3980691.jp

The Scotsman reports that it has been claimed that a lack of investment in bilingual school staff could force a “mass exodus” of Polish families leaving a huge hole in the labour market and crippling the Scottish economy.

Polish children are allegedly asking their parents to take them home as there is no-one to teach them properly at school. Economists have already warned that migrant workers could leave because of the plunging value of the pound against the Euro and the Polish zloty. Now business leaders claim Polish pupils are feeling isolated and foreign workers do not want to sacrifice their children’s education. Polish groups and MSPs are calling for further assistance to be given to help workers’ children to learn English.

One in 20 may suffer effects of ‘number blindness’

http://news.scotsman.com/education/One-in-20-may-suffer.3980677.jp

The Scotsman claims that more than 50,000 Scots may be unable to count or do simple sums because of an undiagnosed learning difficulty.

Academics believe as much as 5% of the population may have some degree of dyscalculia, which affects the ability to count and understand numbers.

It means they struggle with simple tasks such as checking their change in a shop, writing down a telephone number or even telling the time. Experts and business leaders warn the effects of dyscalculia are costing firms billions and potentially costing individuals their future as they struggle to find jobs which don’t require basic numeracy.

Dads ‘don’t read bedtime stories’

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7340720.stm
The BBC reports that less than half of fathers regularly read bedtime stories to their children, research has suggested.

Some 42% of fathers said they were bedtime story readers, compared with 76% of mothers, a poll of 2,207 adults for the National Year of Reading found.

But 60% of fathers blamed long hours and stress. Television was children’s most common pre-sleep activity. Children’s Secretary Ed Balls said reading opened doors to everything. Boys are consistently outperformed by girls when it comes to reading. Last year 87% of girls reached the required standard of reading at the end of primary school, compared with 81% of boys.

News from Barrington Stoke

Barrington Stoke is a specialist publisher for dyslexic and struggling readers age 8-18+.The concept is simple: First class fiction by famous authors presented in a form that is easily accessible- Reading age 8 or below.

Already widely used by Scottish High Schools in both Learning Support departments and libraries, we now have growing demand from Primary schools.

 

2008 sees our 10th Birthday and we are happy to work with Advisers and Quality Improvement teams to support any  events /initiatives that may be planned by offering a free book to teachers attending. Once teachers know about us we find they really like our books and say students are motivated to read more.

If you or any of your colleagues would like to arrange an appointment to see some of our titles and learn more about what Barrington Stoke can offer schools , please contact me on the number below.

Alternatively you can e-mail me at gaynor.fry@barringtonstoke.co.uk 

 

As part of our 2008 birthday celebrations we will be launching a new series called SOLO for 11-13 year olds but with a reading age of 6.5. Our materials have always been well received and the success of the company has been built on producing quality fiction, written by award-winning authors.

Our books are never dumbed-down or patronising. They are compelling stories that children enjoy reading- very accessible so that readers build up confidence.  

We make sure that our covers look good – they don’t look like schoolbooks or educational titles. Children are often embarrassed about having reading problems, so Barrington Stoke books don’t look any different to other publishers’ books. And there is never anything on the cover to suggest the books are for struggling readers.  

 

Every detail matters

 

·               We use our own font, Barrington Stoke Roman, which was designed for us by language specialists. It’s proven to help dyslexics avoid mixing up letters and ensure a smooth read.

·               We print on cream or off-white paper, which is easier for dyslexics than reading black print on white.

·               Paragraphs are never too long, and dialogue is clearly marked.

·               Uneven lines help the reader keep his or her place

·               Text size and line spacing are carefully calculated and tested – not too small, not too large – so we know we’re using the clearest and most readable layout.

·               All books have chapters, to provide lots of natural breaks for readers.

 

You can find out more about us by visiting our website www.barringtonstoke.co.uk

however, I would be delighted to visit you  too.

 

GAYNOR FRY

Educational Sales Representative 

Mob:078 464 89880

e-mail: gaynor.fry@barringtonstoke.co.uk

Barrington Stoke Publishers

Children’s Publisher of the Year 2007 (Independent Publishing Awards)

Company reg no: SC169395

*Shortlisted for two 2008 Independent Publishing Awards – Children’s Publisher of the Year and Educational Publisher of the Year*