Using IEP formats within SEEMIS – pilot update

 

  Since 2002,  East Lothian schools have recorded IEPs targets for pupils with additional support needs on formats developed by North Ayrshire Council.  These documents are  ‘stand alone’ and do not link to our management information system.  The North Ayrshire format is also not aligned with educational targets within Curriculum for Excellence.

Following extensive research and consultation, a number of schools in East Lothian have been asked to pilot the use of  SEEMIS Pupil Plans as an alternative IEP format.  The SEEMIS Pupil Plan has been developed by City of Edinburgh Council in collaboration with SEEMIS and the Scottish Government and is now used in an increasing number of Scottish  authorities.

A decision will be taken later this session as to whether all  East Lothian schools will use this format in the future.

Schools will be kept informed of any further developments.  However if you would like further information about the pilot, please get in touch with Linda Gaughan at lgaughan@eastlothian.gov.uk

Sharing news and ideas

Happy New Year to all!

Another year starts and information overload will continue.  We need to find a way to access the valuable stuff and share it with all interested parties.  Is it going to be this blog or on Glow?  Or both? 

Subscribe to this blog by adding your email address to the box on the right hand side of page.  You will receive an email alert when a new post is added, saving you time and reminding you that the Support for All blog exists and that you too can share news here.  

Obviously you can’t subscribe to the email feed if you don’t get this far and are reading this post so please pass on the information to anyone who is involved with pupils with additional needs. Thanks!

Just Support For Learning?

December’s Children in Scotland magazine contains an article I have written about this being a good time to consider if current support for learning practices are actually achieving what we want them to. You can read the article here Just Support For Learning.  I would be interested to learn your thoughts on the issues it raises.

 The  December Children in Scotland   magazine has a focus on protecting children’s services in tough times. (There may be a small charge to access the whole magazine – but you can read my article for free).

Liz Herd

CPD about dyslexia and inclusion

Several Support for Learning teachers comleted the course Hidden Dyslexia this year and most found it very helpful. The providers, CPDBytes, is now offering a 70% Discount on all its courses if you register before 15th December.

For example
    * Hidden Dyslexia, normally £100 now only £30
    * Inclusion: Introduction for Teachers reduced from £150 to only £45
    * Inclusion courses for Teaching/Learning Assistants reduced from £100 to only £30
    * Barriers to Learning usually £50 now only £15
    * Disability and Dyslexia Awareness for Post 16 Educators reduced from £100 to only £30

How it works;

1. Browse all of our courses on our website http://cpdbytes.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=79b9667153aaee41587daf08f&id=d01c72eec0&e=4f83e55fee
2. Choose the course or courses you want to do.
3. Reserve your course by clicking register now and entering your details.
4. The offer is open only until 15 December 2010 at 12 noon!
5. After that date we will invoice you for your selected course(s) – with your discount applied.
6. Once the payment is completed you will receive an enrollment key by e-mail within 5 days.

7. You will have up to 6 months to complete your course.

Please e-mail alasdair@cpdbytes.com if you have any queries.

Ipads and disability

Ipads will be on many children’s Christmas list this year mainly because of advertised hype and the perceived ‘cool factor’ of possessing the latest Apple product.    It will keep children amused for a certain amount of time but depending on the apps installed, they will likely gravitate back to their laptop.

But for some children – and adults – the iPad could prove invaluable. Read this article which appeared in the New York Times about Owen Cain who has had motor neurone disease from infancy.  His parents say he is a normal boy trapped in a abnormal body.  “We have spent all this time keeping him alive, and now we owe him more than that,” said his mother, Ellen Goldstein, “I see his ability to communicate and to learn as a big part of that challenge — not all of it, but a big part of it.

The iPad has been a tremendous breakthrough and opens up endless possibilities.  So many of it’s features ideally suit those who have limited movements, hearing and sight.  Owen can have his arm hoisted into a position which allows him, with the lightest of touches, to read a book by flicking over the pages.  He even typed up, ” I want to be Han Solo for Hallowe’en” using the onscreen keyboard.

Read the story, watch the video.  It’s made me think, wonder, cry and plan.

Additional Support for Learning Act 2009

The Scottish Government announces that the rights of children with additional education support needs will be strengthened on Sunday (November 14) when the Additional Support for Learning (Scotland) Act 2009 comes into force.

It will ensure that children and young people with additional support needs and their parents can make out of the area placing requests for specific schools and receive mediation and dispute resolution help following such requests. It will also increase parents’ access to the Additional Support Needs Tribunals for Scotland (ASNTS) if a placing request is refused.

Referring a pupil for ICT support

Please note that the old Microtechnology referral form is outdated and was replaced in May 2010 with the ICT Referral Form.  You will find it saved on Education Exchange (Support for Learners / Referral Forms) or you can access it through this link.   Old forms can no longer be accepted and will be returned.

Accurate information supplied on the new form results in a quicker turnaround for the whole review, assessment  and decision process to be carried out.

ICT Referral Form

Wellington Square reading activities online

The Wellington Square website is designed for use alongside the book components of the Wellington Square Reading Scheme. This scheme provides interesting and lively stories for lower ability readers.

The website is easy to navigate and contains a range of activities to support the teaching of reading skills to pupils with Additional Support Needs.

After logging onto the website, pupils are able to enter the Character pages. The character pages follow the same format and are all updated over the course of a term. Each character area contains an introduction, game, quiz, character information, character facts and character questions.  A coloured logo on each web page specifies the reading level for that page. Vocabulary from that level’s word wall is included in the text and there are links to some of the books the pupils may have read.

Pupils must read each character’s area before attempting the quiz section, as all questions are related to the character information and character facts. The website also has ‘Ask a Question’ which pupils can address to a character and receive a reply on the website the following day.

These resources could be used in a variety of settings – whole class teaching, group work or independently.  Worth a look!

Dyslexia Awareness Week: Myths about Dyslexia

See you on the other side by Annalisa Shepherd

Next week is Dyslexia Awareness Week and I shall be posting something here every day.

First, here is a list of myths about dyslexia. I’ll make sure each one is debunked before the end of the week!

Myth 1: Dyslexia does not exist.

Myth 2: Dyslexia is a “catch all” term.

Myth 3: Intelligence and ability to read are related. So if someone doesn’t read well, they can’t be very bright. Equally, very able children cannot be dyslexic.

Myth 4: People with dyslexia cannot read.

Myth 5: People with dyslexia see things backwards.

Myth 6: Dyslexia is rare.

Myth 7: Dyslexia is a medical diagnosis.

Myth 8: Children outgrow dyslexia.

Myth 9: Dyslexia affects four times more boys than girls.

Myth 10: Any child who reverses letters or numbers has dyslexia.

Myth 11: Every child who struggles with reading is a learner with dyslexia.

Myth 12: Children with dyslexia are just lazy. If only they tried harder…

 

Thanks to Annalisa Shepherd for the picture.

National Advocacy Service launched

Support for young people

The creation of a new additional support needs national advocacy service was announced today.

Barnardo’s Scotland in partnership with the Scottish Child Law Centre have been awarded the contract to provide free lay and legal advice to families and young people who appeal to the Additional Support Needs Tribunals for Scotland (ASNTS) against education authorities’ decisions regarding the provision of educational support, such as out of area placing requests.