Service Development Fund report form – Tranent and Musselburgh Baby Massage (Jan-June2015)

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Tranent Musselburgh baby massage Development Fund Report June 2015

Funding is requested to provide 3 Baby Massage courses in the Tranent Cluster for 2015 (school term times). Courses will be provided at Tranent Library (MacNeil room), being a central location, be promoted by Health Visitors and advertised via Tranent SFTS Facebook page. Courses will be for 1hour for 4 weeks. The courses are slightly shorter in time as the discussion part of the session will roll into the existing NCT Early Days drop-in. This is due to limited room and instructor availablility. One course will be delivered from May-June and two courses between August-December, depending on demand. Baby Massage is part of Tranent Cluster’s Parenting Pathway and is recognised as a positive, bonding experience for parents and babies.

 

 

 

 

 

Act Plan Study Do

Tranent Musselburgh baby massage Development Fund Report June 2015

Funding is requested to provide 3 Baby Massage courses in the Tranent Cluster for 2015 (school term times). Courses will be provided at Tranent Library (MacNeil room), being a central location, be promoted by Health Visitors and advertised via Tranent SFTS Facebook page. Courses will be for 1hour for 4 weeks. The courses are slightly shorter in time as the discussion part of the session will roll into the existing NCT Early Days drop-in. This is due to limited room and instructor availablility. One course will be delivered from May-June and two courses between August-December, depending on demand. Baby Massage is part of Tranent Cluster’s Parenting Pathway and is recognised as a positive, bonding experience for parents and babies.

 

 

 

 

 

Service Development Fund Report – Child Development Course S3 students Musselburgh Grammar

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Community Learning & Development and Musselburgh Grammar School are working in partnership to develop and deliver a Child Development Course for S3 students. The course will be delivered to 40 students (2 classes) for 2 hours per week for the duration of the school year starting June 2014. The course aims to provide students with an introduction to child development and an opportunity to increase knowledge and skills in childcare, storytelling, play, healthy eating, baby and child First Aid. They will also be able to do short term placements in local childcare settings to apply classroom learning. The course aims to provide valuable life skills for students as parents of the future, and increase employability schools.

Child Development Course S3 Muss gram fund Report 2015

Service Development Fund Report – PEEP Messy Play Prestonpans

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We would like to develop Messy Play with Parents from the Prestonpans area at the Pennypit centre.   We have a large creche space with an out door area, which would be a good area to encourage participation in the benefits of Messy play.   We have had some taister sessions in 2013 and the feed back from parents was very positive.    We would like to promote PEEP through the Messy Play sessions and advertise the groups through local Health visitors targeting parents with Children under 3 building peer support to encourage parents who are harder to reach.   We would also like to build a bank of PEEP trained people to work locally building on relationships with harder to reach parents to encourage participation.    The project would run for 12 months with 10 week blocks of activities.   We plan to have two play/PEEP workers for the first hour and then input for an hour from myself and the family worker on building on personal development for parents and time to possibly complete the parenting qualification as part of the PEEP.

PEEP Messy Play 2014 report form

Service Development Fund Report – PEEP Musselburgh Cluster

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We aimed to run 3 blocks of PEEP led by PEEP practitioners in the Musselburgh cluster and in particular target the East of Musselburgh as it has significantly higher levels of multiple deprivation.    The first block would aim to start in May 2014, the second in Sept 2014 and finally the last block would run in Jan 2015. We aim to provide and promote quality play experiences for children and their parents/carers that would contribute towards improvement in educational attainment and life chances.  This programme has a focus on literacy and how to make the most of everyday learning through listening, talking, playing, singing and sharing books.  There would be a commitment to support parents to identify future learning needs.        Peep Musselburgh

Piloting a Social Marketing approach to healthy eating at First Step Community project

The final report on the pilot of social marketing at First Step Community Project as a technique to influence health related behaviour change is linked below.

The following is the conclusion of the report

Conclusion: The pilot project has delivered on its four main objectives to: work collaboratively with parents to identify health issues, and approaches to address these; to make links with appropriate agencies and to share the learning gained from using a social marketing approach.

The impact of this pilot on behaviour change is less clear however this may have been due to the timing and methods used to gather this information, rather than a lack of impact. Small shift in behaviours that are not easy to quantify and measures have been observed by First Step staff who work closely with the parents and grandparents Whether this is directly attributable to the social marketing developments or is reflective a combinations of approaches used in and by First Step is difficult to determine.

Advantages of the social marketing approach were that some principles did direct the steering group to consider certain issues in more depth than they may have with other health improvement methodology. Examples of this were considering barriers and competition to healthy behaviours and the notion of an exchange value (giving up one behaviour for another had to have some value in it)

It was felt that a number of the principles, such as, customer orientation, segmenting and using a theory base were common to other approaches. However as these principles were described in new terminology there was some confusion as the group searched for new meaning or different principles behind the terms.

Social marketing is a valuable health improvement tool to be familiar with and can offer other organisations some unique principles to follow. It worked well within an organisation that; already worked alongside their clients in a partnership way; could support small groups with intensive developments and were familiar with similar approaches such as community development.

First Step Social Maketing Report

Midlothian Champions report

The Midlothian Equally Well Readiness to Learn test site was established late in 2009, as a development of the initial test site in East Lothian with a focus on early years. The rationale behind the Midlothian test site was to focus activities and learning around improving readiness to learn, to contribute to breaking the cycle of poorer than average health outcomes (in Midlothian) in the target communities: Gorebridge, Mayfield and Woodburn.

Its aims were:

> to develop sustainable improvements in early years’ services by involving local people in shaping services that improve health and wellbeing

to build understanding and support joint working between agencies and community organisations on health inequality

to support innovative approaches to improving readiness for learning.

The report linked here details the work developed by the Midlothian Service champions to imprve and develop services and engage parents in improving readiness to learn in the communities of Mayfield, Woodburn and Gorebridge, The report details some exciting work either developing exisitng good practise or services innovating and redesigning what they do to improve readiness to learn

 Midlothian Report LR

Parenting and health inequality

Attended a 1/2 day conference held by the Growing Up in Scotland team earlier this week. The session was led off by the new early years minister Angela Constance and one phrase in her speech caught my attention in particular.

As parents its what we do, not who we are, that is most important.

By which I think she meant that parents who are facing adversity in the form of poverty or poor health can do as good a job as parents who aren’t facing the same adversity. I think we all know that to be true, or at least we want it to be true.

However, it is also true that many parents do become overwhelmed by the adversity they face in bringing up children. Talking to some head teachers in the last week or so has highlighted this for me. In the run up to the summer holidays many parents and children face the summer holidays not with a sense of joy and opportunity, but with with a sense of foreboding -‘how am I going to cope without the structure that school and nursery provides’. For many children this fear is expressed in terms of their behaviour in school, and for the child protection system I suspect it is reflected in the number of Initial Referral Discussions that take place in the run up to the summer holidays. ( I would guess that the economic climate is making the summer holiday period even harder for some parents this year?)

Services are responding with partnership approaches to supporting families over the summer period. In Midlothian Equally well champions are using their development fund to support a project called ‘Play in the Park’ which has been developed in the Woodburn community over a number of years, and will extend it to the neighbouring community in Mayfield, they are also exploring ways of further supporting transition from nursery to P1.  In East Lothian champions are currently discussing whether to support for  a second year a Summer transition programme supporting parents of children who are moving from nursery to P1 who need some additional support

Talking about parenting skills always makes me a bit twitchy, partly because even if nobody is else is making judgements about me as a parent I cant’ help making judgement about myself. For the same reason I have never felt completely comfortable with parenting courses / programmes which are the focus of many parenting strategies. More fundamentally than doubts about my own performance I also wonder whether parenting programmes over emphasise the individual parent behaviours rather than the wider family and community support that is fundamental to good parenting. It is easier to be consistent with rules, be positive and affirmative and to have a good attachment or connection with your child / children if you feel supported as a parent and can access a network of practical and emotional resources. Angela Constance also spoke about the development of a national parenting strategy for Scotland which was a manifesto commitment for the SNP. I for one hope that it is as strategy for family support as much as a strategy for developing parenting skills.

The GUS team have made a particular study of parenting skills and their relationship with health and a presentation on the findings is linked here There is also an audio file of the presentation from Dr Alison Parkes on the GUS website. The slides are quite complex so the audio file is well worth listening to.

 

‘Healthy Happy Bairns’

The output from a year long evaluation study led by the Queen Margaret Univerity ChangexChange team is linked below.

 Healthy Happy Bairns FINAL INTERNET VERSION

 The evaluation found that Support from the Start has created significant outcomes for children and their families. Children had new-found confidence, improved social relationships, were better equipped to cope with change, were more ready for school, and benefited from a more structured and more settled day and family life.  Parents involved improved their relationships with their children, were more able to avoid significant mental health issues, were less stressed and more able to cope with life events, had increased personal confidence, and were able to find support from extended social networks.

 We are confident that ‘Healthy Happy Bairns’ will be a source of ideas and inspiration for a range of professionals and organisations seeking to make a difference to health inequalities in the early years.  We would recommend that practitioners, managers and leaders take the learning and use it to make the changes required to create a positive impact in the early years experience of all children, so that they can secure a stable, healthy and happy future.

 

Champions development fund

Service & Community champions are a key part of Support from the Start, they are people with an interest in health, equality and the early years from across a wide range of services.

Champions have access to shared learning (action learning) and a small peer reviewed development fund. Many exciting project have been taken forward by the champions using this fund – but this by no means represents the total of initiatives that champions have taken forward only those for which they have used development funds. A link to a monitoring rport for the fund over the financial year 2010 – 2011 is below –

Summary 2010 2011 (4)

‘Music and Me’

 ‘Music and Me’, a resource for Nursery staff, is the product of a process that began almost eighteen months ago in Preston Lodge High School. There, as part of a wider conference about ‘Learning, Emotions and Well Being’, Dave Trouton, a talented musician and composer, led a workshop presentation about using music to help develop emotional literacy in a teenage group. At about this time, too, the scoping of an ‘outcome pathway’ for readiness to learn in young children was being developed as part of the planning for ‘Support from the Start’. This process recognised that there was scope for further development of the role of music and rhythm to support language development in the early years. Sheila Laing, HT of Campie Primary School, and Education Department service champion for ‘Support from the Start’, then developed a proposal to pilot work in this area in a nursery setting and, if possible, develop a resource that could be used by all nursery staff, irrespective of their own perceived musical ability.

Many months later, a successful pilot of ‘Music and Me’ has been completed in the nursery classes of Wallyford and Whitecraig Primary Schools, and a second stage pilot in Campie and St. Martin’s nursery classes will start soon. Two key outcomes for ‘Support from the Start’ – improving readiness to learn (aspects such as active listening, concentration, turn taking), and improving emotional well being (for example developing self expression and emotional literacy) are addressed in the resource, as well as skills such as carrying out instructions, turn-taking and co-operation and collaboration. CPD in how to use the resource will be offered to nursery staff in all East Lothian primary schools early next session, alongside a roll-out to all primary schools. The resource has tried to address, among other things, real concerns on the part of the nursery children. Anxietyabout using the dinner hall, queuing, making choices, etc., when they moved up to P1 has been addressed through pupil involvement in a ‘Sound Story’ within the resource, and ‘Grandad Turnip’s Story’ helps children to discuss not only why it’s ok to feel sad sometimes, but also the importance of telling someone about it.

 

Discussion and active listening play a big part in the lessons. Feedback from the initial pilot has been very positive, not just from staff. ‘Is the music man coming back in?’ asked one pre-school pupil, just a few weeks ago.

Final word must go to Pat Holden, Principal Teacher of Primary Music Specialists, who, while delighted to have been involved in the production of this very practical resource that can be accessed by all nursery staff without requiring any specific musical skills, adds that he sincerely hopes ‘that this is aresource that will be well used and not just sit on a table in the music corner!’

Written by Mary Howie

The following link has a short vdeo of a Music & Me seesion with a voiceover commentary by at Pat Holden

https://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0BxkVZo58FAzFZTM3NTQyYjEtNjVmNi00YTg1LTg3ZjgtMDFhZGU1NTVkZjdl&hl=en_GB&authkey=CMzstYEO